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  1. #1
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    cpu and RAM in phones

    what is the current range of RAM and cpu speeds supported in Nokia phones? are these likely to increase quickly or is this a slow progress technology?

  2. #2
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    Re: cpu and RAM in phones

    I think Ram is increasing in n series(symbian phones) but i don't think CPU speed is increasing. It just stopped at 220mhz

  3. #3
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    Re: cpu and RAM in phones

    What makes you think CPU clocking has somehow stopped at 220MHz with Symbian based phones? That's not so.

  4. #4
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    Re: cpu and RAM in phones

    FYI.
    Nokia N93 is 330MHz.

    Regards
    Skygyl

  5. #5
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    Re: cpu and RAM in phones

    there was a thread just like this a few months back, there might be more info in that thread. This is the list that I posted in it. It only covers the processors though. I still don't have a compiled list of the RAM amounts.

    http://pantosh.com/?p=26

    Enjoy.

  6. #6
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    Re: cpu and RAM in phones

    The big challenge with mobile phone design at the moment is not getting sufficient CPU speed or RAM but enough battery life. Users still seem to want small phones so although a 600MHz processor could be included in a phone now it isn't likely to happen just yet because the battery just wouldn't be able to cope with running it flat out for long.

    The other issue is the speed of the RAM. If your RAM only runs at 100MHz say then you get very little benefit from increasing the clock speed above around 200MHz (very roughly - it does of course depend on other factors like how big the cache is and what sort of code/algorithms you are running). Faster RAM is more expensive and pushes up the price of the phones. I know of some Samsung devices that had 400MHz processors but they do very badly in benchmarking like this test on Pantosh's blog: http://pantosh.com/wp-content/upload...11/gxbench.gif
    because they only had 66MHz RAM.

    So, to get better performance out of the phones it is really going to be down changes in the processor architectures (IMHO) rather than just increasing clock speed. Although the processor speed on phones is likely to increase over the next few years I don't think we're like to see a 1GHz phone any time soon (or if we do it's likely to be very big or have very short battery life).

    Sorcery
    Last edited by Sorcery-ltd; 2006-12-15 at 14:27.

  7. #7
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    Re: cpu and RAM in phones

    Quote Originally Posted by Sorcery-ltd
    Although the processor speed on phones is likely to increase over the next few years I don't think we're like to see a 1GHz phone any time soon (or if we do it's likely to be very big or have very short battery life).
    And it would be too hot to hold in your hand.

  8. #8
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    Re: cpu and RAM in phones

    This is an interesting discussion. I am wondering how far we can go with processor speed, size, etc?

    There should be a physical limit of the processor. For example, OMAP 2420 uses 90 nm CMOS and OMAP 3430 uses 65 nm CMOS. How small we can go after that? There must be "something" that prevents us to go smaller and smaller.

    The same for battery. What is the maximum chemical energy we can store in a battery for a given size?

    Well, I am not an expert in physics and chemistry, so couldn't comment so much on this.

    Antony

  9. #9
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    Re: cpu and RAM in phones

    As I understand it we really need some new battery technology or alternative power source to continue significantly improving the performance of handheld devices for much longer.

    Battery capacity improves by about 10-15% a year I've heard. At the same time we can double processing power every 2-3 years. Those two don't go together. Moving to smaller chip fabrication (e.g. 90nm -> 65nm) can reduce the power require to run at higher clock speeds but we really are getting near the limits of this type of improvement. There's always some new technology around the corner though so who knows?

    One problem is that as things get smaller there seems to be a tendency for the ICs to have higher standby currents which is an absolute disaster for battery life on a phone. I'm not sure about the reasons for that it's just something I've noticed - perhaps it can be fixed in the design stage.

    From a software point of view I think these constraints on the performance growth are a good thing. There's a chance we can keep the code more efficient and compact on mobiles rather than this ridiculous bloatware that is filling my PC!

    Sorcery

  10. #10
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    Re: cpu and RAM in phones

    The new N and E series are so feature packed that they often mimic the features found on a laptop.

    My laptop has a 4000 mAh battery and when set on power saver it will last, at most, 2 hours. The battery is roughly 8" x 1" x 2" and is pretty heavy. On power power saver mode the processor is dropped down to 900 MHz, the screen is dimmed to almost nothing, and the video card is barely used.

    So a phone lasting 1 -2 days I find rather impressive.

  11. #11
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    Re: cpu and RAM in phones

    Power saving mode on a laptop is not exactly a fair comparison. Try standby mode! The thing is that a phone has to be "on" all the time to listen for a page from the network (actually it just wakes up for a few 10s of ms every couple of seconds and is off the rest of the time). A laptop is only on when you want to use it.

    If the processing power of smartphones starts to approach that of laptops with around 1/4 the battery capacity then you'll see the battery going flat in 30 minutes on a high performance application. No-one will accept that. Power users might get used to having to charge their phone every day but it's no good for the mass market.

    Sorcery

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