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  1. #1
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    Lightbulb To Develop on Windows Phone, or Not? ... Is That Really the Question?

    Hello All,

    It has now been a little more than 2 weeks since Nokia announced its new platform strategy including its planned partnership with Microsoft. Shocking that it has only been a bit more than 14 days. Even more shocking has been how much 'Nokia' has been mentioned in the latest tech news and tech blogs around the globe. Even within the United States! No doubt, some of the biggest, most significant news coming out of Nokia in years.

    But what does it really mean for developers?

    Much like all of you, I have read my share of news articles, blog posts, and dozens of opinions regarding Nokia’s new platform strategy and more specifically adopting Windows Phone as our primary OS for future smartphones. Although the overwhelming initial response from the community has been rather negative, I personally feel that this is a huge leap in the right direction for us. We need to understand that as substantial as this news is, it is still all very new for everyone, both employees and developers alike. Many specifics are still yet to be determined, and that is to be understood for such a tremendously monumental move as this is. I sincerely believe that once all the dust settles, with everything falling into place, we will be able to offer our developers something special. A truly unique and compelling developer offering unlike anything before. That being said, and my personal opinions aside, I’d like to offer a simple suggestion:

    The real question is not “Should I develop on Windows Phone?”

    The real question we need to ask ourselves is “What do my Consumers want?”

    I look at it like this. We are all creatures of habit. Not many people like change. To quote Forum Nokia Champion, Maximiliano Firtman, “Our human nature don’t like change, but I like it and I believe that with change we can create evolution, and with evolution there is a lot of new great opportunities for developers…” In my opinion, Max hits the nail right on the head. There is a tremendous opportunity ahead for us.

    So, I used to do some PHP/MySQL programming as well as some C++ within UNIX back in my college days. I fully understand that as a developer you become very comfortable and familiar with specific coding languages, syntax, platforms, and tool sets. There is no doubt about that. However, rather than refusing to try out or adopt a new platform because of whatever limits or preset notions we have set in our heads, why not just give it a shot? In no way should our emotions get in the way of what the consumers want. At the end of the day, isn’t that really what it is all about? Offering the absolute best experience to Nokia’s consumers. Whether that experience is on a Nokia device running Symbian, Windows Phone, or MeeGo it should not matter. What matters is the consumer.

    I ask all Nokians, but most importantly our loyal developers from around the globe; please keep this in mind moving forward. Our goal is a shared one. To provide the best and most compelling content for our consumers regardless of platform, OS, or coding technique. We can do this, and we can succeed. However, one thing is clear; we cannot do this without you. Our developers. I’ll repeat, we can NOT do this without you.

    Warmest Regards,

    Bill Volpe
    Multimedia Producer & Content Manager
    Forum Nokia
    bill.volpe@nokia.com

  2. #2
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    Re: To Develop on Windows Phone, or Not? ... Is That Really the Question?

    That's a very nice speech, but what reasons are Nokia offering developers to change to Windows Phone?

    There were reasons for Symbian developers to change to Qt. You could migrate your existing apps in parts, for example, keeping your underlying code and implementing to a new UI, gradually moving to pure Qt and cross platform with MeeGo.

    There are reasons to change to iOS & Android, where there are large markets of users that are only going to grow. Of all the individuals and companies making a living from app developments (i.e. not doing it part time around a day job), how many make their living on those platforms? I'd say a significant number.

    There are even reasons to change to BlackBerry, as you can make a quite nice livinig developing apps for companies to use internally, or apps aimed for business use were people / companies will pay more than the €1 price point consumer app stores are rushing towards.

    And if over the next 18 months, tens of millions of WP7 devices are sold, then you'd have a reason to change to develop for that platform.

    But what are the reasons today? Why should the next project I develop be on Windows Phone? It has very little market share. It's very limited to what the platform allows you to do.

    And this is coming from a software engineer who's largest block of experience on their CV has been developing on Windows using MFC, COM, WTL and more recently .net (Managed C++ and C#). If I'm dubious of the benefits of switching to WP7 (a platform I'm largely familiar with, .net, Visual Studio, etc) for my next project, how are you expecting developers with no experience / links to Microsoft techs to think?

    So again, how are you planning on persuading people to not switch to other development platforms while Nokia's ramping up their Windows Phone output?

  3. #3
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    Re: To Develop on Windows Phone, or Not? ... Is That Really the Question?

    Quote Originally Posted by andynugent View Post
    %snip%
    So again, how are you planning on persuading people to not switch to other development platforms while Nokia's ramping up their Windows Phone output?
    I can't discuss short term and long term strategy. What I can say is we are going to do it in the weeks and months ahead we will do it. Nokia will not settle to be just another device maker.

    Ron

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    Re: To Develop on Windows Phone, or Not? ... Is That Really the Question?

    Quote Originally Posted by bill.volpe View Post
    I fully understand that as a developer you become very comfortable and familiar with specific coding languages, syntax, platforms, and tool sets...However, rather than refusing to try out or adopt a new platform because of whatever limits or preset notions we have set in our heads, why not just give it a shot? In no way should our emotions get in the way of what the consumers want.
    Hi Bill-

    You make some good points in your post, but I think this one might be missing the mark a little. While I've seen Symbian consumers making emotional arguments, developer arguments have been fairly pragmatic. The concerns, or at least the ones I've expressed, are focused around two central points: code reuse and artificial limitations.

    Develop in C/C++ with cross-platform APIs, deploy on:

    iOS
    Android
    Symbian
    Linux (Meego, WoPhone)
    BREW
    Blackberry TabletOS
    Bada
    OSX
    Windows

    Develop in C#, deploy on:

    Windows Phone 7+
    Windows

    Considering Windows is in both lists, there needs to be a strong Windows Phone business case for writing or rewriting software in C#, as the expense and risk isn't spread over multiple platforms.

    If consumers want Windows Phone phones, the business case will be there.

    Nokia may be able to create that business case next year with their WP smartphone offerings, but currently, at least for publishers who aren't getting MS guarantees, it's not there yet on Windows Phone. (Actually WP has a lot of emotionally motivated developers ATM, just like Meego/Maemo, but what gets those communities excited and motivated are completely opposite attributes.)

    Microsoft seems to be addressing the limitations: no sockets, no multitasking, limited language support, limited marketplace territories. The Nokia partnership could help them with the last two.
    Last edited by proberts; 2011-03-02 at 23:50.

  5. #5
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    Re: To Develop on Windows Phone, or Not? ... Is That Really the Question?

    Quote Originally Posted by bill.volpe View Post
    I ask all Nokians, but most importantly our loyal developers from around the globe; please keep this in mind moving forward.
    moving from opened, native, C++ based, multiplatform Qt to closed, with a lot of restrictions, one-platform .Net is definitely step backward
    Our goal is a shared one. To provide the best and most compelling content for our consumers regardless of platform, OS, or coding technique. We can do this, and we can succeed. However, one thing is clear; we cannot do this without you. Our developers. I’ll repeat, we can NOT do this without you.
    this is good you understand this.
    Providing us with Qt for WP7 will keep us from migrating
    Symbian & Qt developer. http://vladest.org

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    Re: To Develop on Windows Phone, or Not? ... Is That Really the Question?

    You are of course correct, the important thing is to focus on what consumers want.

    I think the real problem with the switch is that there's no real indication that simply having Windows Phone 7 instead of S60 is suddenly going to bring Apple like success to Ovi store (or whatever Microsoft call their offering). One of the draws of developing on S60 is the sheer size of the addressable market. If you only have to sell 10-50 thousand copies of an application to earn a living, then your chances are that much higher with perhaps 200 million possible users, over 2 million.

    One of the problems that got us to this point, is the simple fact that iPhone users are simply different type of user to S60 users. iPhone users are much more likely to actually go and drop a few $s on games and apps, and the device UX makes that so much more enticing than it has ever been on S60, with which most users are fairly satisfied with what the device does out of the box, and few even go looking for games or apps (And I know you'll have statistics on the number of devices that have used the Ovi client -and the Download! one before it!). If you do manage to successfully convert your existing customers to WinPhone7, and that could be quite a challenge, and we've not really heard anything about how you are going to ensure these customers are more likely to start buying apps and games. Flashy transition effects and a snappy font isn't the answer. I rather suspect that you will end up attracting a different class of customer (who may well spend on aftermarket apps) and disenfranchise existing S60 users. There's no indication that this install base of Nokia Windows Phones is going to be anywhere near as large are the S60 base.

    Of course, as a provider of bespoke software development, if a client asks for something to be developed for WinPhone7, I'll be happy to oblige. As a independent developer, I have to target devices that I think my 'consumers' will be using, to maximise my addressable market. And I don't think that is going to be Windows any time soon. And that's Catch-22.

    A.
    CowboyCoder Inc.

  7. #7
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    Re: To Develop on Windows Phone, or Not? ... Is That Really the Question?

    I am with andynugent. For the commercial developers it is important that they keep a healthy revenue stream going on during the transition. It is all very nice if in two years time Nokia sells millions of WP phones, but that would be the point if our own business collapsed during that period? My bank manager wants cash for the mortgage, not apps, not even Qt ones, and the supermarket, the petrol station and the phone company are not very keen on apps as barter either.

    So, we run a business, you run a business. No revenue stream, no business. You do not even need to have an MBA to understand this.

    What can be done about keeping our revenue stream from Ovi flowing? A couple of things.

    1) Nokia need to make clear to their Ovi customers that their investment in Symbian apps is not wasted, because these apps will become available on WP too.

    2) On the technical side, this can be done by packaging both the Symbian app and the WP app in a container file (which can be a zip file). The Symbian installer extracts and installs the Symbian app, the WP installer extracts and installs the WP app.

    3) Current Symbian and WP installers do not do this, but since Nokia WP phones are not available for months so there is plenty of time to upgrade both Symbian and WP.

    4) Developers have then plenty of time to both create WP versions of their apps, and keep the revenue stream from their Symbian apps.

    To lower developer cost, Nokia and Microsoft might want to consider giving developers free access to Microsofts Developer program for a year or two. This should include free tools and free OS licenses, in particular a free Windows 7 Pro license. Note that developers are either on a paid for copy of WinXP, or on free Linux, or on much cheaper Mac OS X.

    Currently Mac OS X is the best OS for mobile developers as it gives access to iOS dev tools and Android dev tools natively, and to Linux and Windows hosted dev tools using a virtual machine. iOS and Android are you biggest competitors, and all your current developers are already developing for these platforms too, or they are moving right now. You want no barriers for them to develop for WP, which means no extra cost, until the WP platform has proven itself.

    To think of developers as belonging to a platform is outdated thinking. Developers can now choose for which platform they develop, and especially the commercial ones have moved to the most promising ones already.
    Last edited by sevdwal; 2011-03-08 at 09:15. Reason: last bullet points is now straight text.

  8. #8
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    Re: To Develop on Windows Phone, or Not? ... Is That Really the Question?

    Quote Originally Posted by sevdwal View Post
    I am with andynugent. For the commercial developers it is important that they keep a healthy revenue stream going on during the transition. It is all very nice if in two years time Nokia sells millions of WP phones, but that would be the point if our own business collapsed during that period? My bank manager wants cash for the mortgage, not apps, not even Qt ones, and the supermarket, the petrol station and the phone company are not very keen on apps as barter either.

    So, we run a business, you run a business. No revenue stream, no business. You do not even need to have an MBA to understand this.

    What can be done about keeping our revenue stream from Ovi flowing? A couple of things.

    1) Nokia need to make clear to their Ovi customers that their investment in Symbian apps is not wasted, because these apps will become available on WP too.
    Nokia has announced a gradual introduction of the WP platform while the Symbian platform is slowly fading out. If in the next 2 years you have 150M more Symbian devices to publish apps for, and they will be active for years still in the market, with Ovi Store there to sell your apps, doesn't that in itself mean that your Symbian investoment is not lost?

    Quote Originally Posted by sevdwal View Post
    2) On the technical side, this can be done by packaging both the Symbian app and the WP app in a container file (which can be a zip file). The Symbian installer extracts and installs the Symbian app, the WP installer extracts and installs the WP app.

    3) Current Symbian and WP installers do not do this, but since Nokia WP phones are not available for months so there is plenty of time to upgrade both Symbian and WP.

    4) Developers have then plenty of time to both create WP versions of their apps, and keep the revenue stream from their Symbian apps.
    I don't see the value that 2) and 3) would bring to anybody. At best it would simplify the Ovi Store submission, as you upload a zip file and provide the metadata only once, ...well, some of it. You will have to create a Windows version of the application and deploy it to your customers, while providing the Symbian version to your other customers as well. Zip or no zip. Why would the store deliver (OTA!?) two packages only for the phone to discard one of it and then install the other? I would understand the request for one common runtime (Qt, Silverlight) across platforms but not the zip thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by sevdwal View Post
    To lower developer cost, Nokia and Microsoft might want to consider giving developers free access to Microsofts Developer program for a year or two. This should include free tools and free OS licenses, in particular a free Windows 7 Pro license. Note that developers are either on a paid for copy of WinXP, or on free Linux, or on much cheaper Mac OS X.

    Currently Mac OS X is the best OS for mobile developers as it gives access to iOS dev tools and Android dev tools natively, and to Linux and Windows hosted dev tools using a virtual machine. iOS and Android are you biggest competitors, and all your current developers are already developing for these platforms too, or they are moving right now. You want no barriers for them to develop for WP, which means no extra cost, until the WP platform has proven itself.

    To think of developers as belonging to a platform is outdated thinking. Developers can now choose for which platform they develop, and especially the commercial ones have moved to the most promising ones already.
    Some valid points there.
    -- Lucian

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  9. #9
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    Re: To Develop on Windows Phone, or Not? ... Is That Really the Question?

    Quote Originally Posted by ltomuta View Post
    Nokia has announced a gradual introduction of the WP platform while the Symbian platform is slowly fading out. If in the next 2 years you have 150M more Symbian devices to publish apps for, and they will be active for years still in the market, with Ovi Store there to sell your apps, doesn't that in itself mean that your Symbian investoment is not lost?
    If you look at the current situation, you see that smartphone news is now part of the mainstream news, prime time news mentions the Nokia-Microsoft deal, there are lots of magazines discussing apps, etc. There is a market for that news and that market consist of app-buying smartphone users. Now, what are these magazines telling the user? They will tell that Symbian is dead and gone in two years. Do you expect these people will invest lots of money in apps? I don't.

    It is not going to be that the market will be gone immediately, but sales will become less and less, especially compared to the competition. Nokia's smartphone competitors are going to point out in great detail that a Symbian app will become worthless, but that their apps will keep working on newer devices.

    See, at this point third-party developers get a lot of risk dumped on them. Their revenue stream is now dependent on the assumption that people will still buy apps for a dead platform. I want that risk to be lessened as much as possible.

    I don't see the value that 2) and 3) would bring to anybody. At best it would simplify the Ovi Store submission, as you upload a zip file and provide the metadata only once, ...well, some of it. You will have to create a Windows version of the application and deploy it to your customers, while providing the Symbian version to your other customers as well. Zip or no zip. Why would the store deliver (OTA!?) two packages only for the phone to discard one of it and then install the other? I would understand the request for one common runtime (Qt, Silverlight) across platforms but not the zip thing.
    Look at the business case, not the enabling technology. As far as the buying customer is concerned, after the move to WP he will be able to download the same app that he has paid for again on a different device. So that app doe not become worthless after they get a WP device. Which means that that customer is much more likely to buy the app in the first place. To achieve that business effect, think of the simplest and easiest to work with technology to implement that business effect.

    It will also be a message from Nokia to developers still interested in working with them, after the Qt abandonment train wreck.

    P.S. For the people who do not understand that Symbian is dead, consider this analogy. A live cow gives milk. A dead cow does not give milk, but you can still eat its flesh. That flesh does not last forever though, at some point you have eaten it all.

  10. #10
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    Re: To Develop on Windows Phone, or Not? ... Is That Really the Question?

    Quote Originally Posted by sevdwal View Post
    If you look at the current situation, you see that smartphone news is now part of the mainstream news, prime time news mentions the Nokia-Microsoft deal, there are lots of magazines discussing apps, etc. There is a market for that news and that market consist of app-buying smartphone users. Now, what are these magazines telling the user? They will tell that Symbian is dead and gone in two years. Do you expect these people will invest lots of money in apps? I don't.
    I would expect that a user makes this decision when buying a phone. Once the phone purchased, probably with a contract, the user will worry not about the future of the platform, as for him the platform is valid at least for the duration of the contract.

    Quote Originally Posted by sevdwal View Post
    It is not going to be that the market will be gone immediately, but sales will become less and less, especially compared to the competition. Nokia's smartphone competitors are going to point out in great detail that a Symbian app will become worthless, but that their apps will keep working on newer devices.

    See, at this point third-party developers get a lot of risk dumped on them. Their revenue stream is now dependent on the assumption that people will still buy apps for a dead platform. I want that risk to be lessened as much as possible.
    I know that you have a lot more experience than me in what it means running a business. And I guess you are [partly] right about the media impact. But a platform does not die when the bloggers call it dead, it only dies when developers lose interest. There are some great apps now in the Ovi Store, it is up to you and the others Symbian developers to bring more, and keep the users interested, while Nokia delivers better OS and hardware and marketing support.

    Quote Originally Posted by sevdwal View Post
    Look at the business case, not the enabling technology. As far as the buying customer is concerned, after the move to WP he will be able to download the same app that he has paid for again on a different device. So that app doe not become worthless after they get a WP device. Which means that that customer is much more likely to buy the app in the first place. To achieve that business effect, think of the simplest and easiest to work with technology to implement that business effect.

    It will also be a message from Nokia to developers still interested in working with them, after the Qt abandonment train wreck.

    P.S. For the people who do not understand that Symbian is dead, consider this analogy. A live cow gives milk. A dead cow does not give milk, but you can still eat its flesh. That flesh does not last forever though, at some point you have eaten it all.
    User conversion, from Nokia Symbian to Nokia WP7 can be handled, if so desired, at Ovi Store level, by simply allowing a user to download WP7 equivalents of their current Symbian application purchases (it they exist).

  11. #11
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    Re: To Develop on Windows Phone, or Not? ... Is That Really the Question?

    Quote Originally Posted by ltomuta View Post
    I would expect that a user makes this decision when buying a phone. Once the phone purchased, probably with a contract, the user will worry not about the future of the platform, as for him the platform is valid at least for the duration of the contract.
    Yes. And that same user can buy a smartphone from Nokia's competitors.

    I know that you have a lot more experience than me in what it means running a business. And I guess you are [partly] right about the media impact. But a platform does not die when the bloggers call it dead, it only dies when developers lose interest. There are some great apps now in the Ovi Store, it is up to you and the others Symbian developers to bring more, and keep the users interested, while Nokia delivers better OS and hardware and marketing support.
    I am not calling Symbian dead because some bloggers are calling it dead, I am calling Symbian dead because it is now dead as far as a developer is concerned, this being explained in my previous post.

    About it being up to me and other developers to write apps, Nokia doesn't own us or something like that. The business risk of developing apps lies completely with the developer. An example of the risks we take is the sudden and unexpected abandonment of a platform by its owner. And the risk that sales on a platform tank after the platform owner declared it dead. The risk that those 150 million devices are not going to be sold. The risk that these 150 million devices are sold to people that do not buy apps.

    Rational people are going to minimize such risks while maximizing their change on lots of revenue. That means moving to platforms with no known upper limit to devices sold, with users that are known to buy apps, or even click on an add, owned a company that isn't likely to abandon their platform suddenly and unexpectedly, because interest in that platform is booming and that company is making more money than God with that platform.

    If Nokia wants developers to write new and interesting apps to keep interest in their platform alive for the coming two years, Nokia must take over these risks, and hire developers to do app development.

    User conversion, from Nokia Symbian to Nokia WP7 can be handled, if so desired, at Ovi Store level, by simply allowing a user to download WP7 equivalents of their current Symbian application purchases (it they exist).
    Of course there are alternatives. How about choosing one that is developer and customer-friendly, for a start?

  12. #12
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    Re: To Develop on Windows Phone, or Not? ... Is That Really the Question?

    That reasoning is questionable. Mixing end-users with developers and extrapolating the behavior of one, based on an assumption about the behavior of the other is something that does not work.

    Do you really think that an end-user will take into account the availability of a fat installer format? (Yes, the concept of fat things is invented already, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fat_binary, if you have not heard about it, what would you expect from the average user?)
    Where is the user-friendly benefit? Nowadays if you want to sell your stuff, you definitely do not want the user to copy the installer between his/her devices, the neighbor's, and anyone else's on warez.org. Then, what? Is it about the 2x2 minutes of uploading the two builds of the application for publishing, instead of uploading them with a single click in a single .zip file?
    Last edited by wizard_hu_; 2011-03-09 at 14:37.

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    Re: To Develop on Windows Phone, or Not? ... Is That Really the Question?

    Quote Originally Posted by sevdwal View Post
    Yes. And that same user can buy a smartphone from Nokia's competitors.
    Those would not be the 150M we're talking about.

    Quote Originally Posted by sevdwal View Post
    I am not calling Symbian dead because some bloggers are calling it dead, I am calling Symbian dead because it is now dead as far as a developer is concerned, this being explained in my previous post.
    If Symbian is dead, why are we still talking about here? I believe that the premise of this discussion is that Symbian is still a valid business proposition, with an existing market not yet exploited to its full potential, and with room to grow still, whithing the predefined constraints.

    Quote Originally Posted by sevdwal View Post
    About it being up to me and other developers to write apps, Nokia doesn't own us or something like that. The business risk of developing apps lies completely with the developer. An example of the risks we take is the sudden and unexpected abandonment of a platform by its owner. And the risk that sales on a platform tank after the platform owner declared it dead. The risk that those 150 million devices are not going to be sold. The risk that these 150 million devices are sold to people that do not buy apps.
    Nokia owns lots of things, but not people. That was never the point. The point was that of a partnership, in which Nokia contributes assets and developers contribute assets, hoping to have success together. I do believe those users would buy apps, if there are apps which they want to buy.

    Quote Originally Posted by sevdwal View Post
    Rational people are going to minimize such risks while maximizing their change on lots of revenue. That means moving to platforms with no known upper limit to devices sold, with users that are known to buy apps, or even click on an add, owned a company that isn't likely to abandon their platform suddenly and unexpectedly, because interest in that platform is booming and that company is making more money than God with that platform.
    There's no such thing as a risk free enterprise. And yes, there are options to minimize your risk. But I find that you can only make more money than God if the risk is also rather high.

    Quote Originally Posted by sevdwal View Post
    If Nokia wants developers to write new and interesting apps to keep interest in their platform alive for the coming two years, Nokia must take over these risks, and hire developers to do app development.
    Oh, so now you want to be "owned" by Nokia?

    Quote Originally Posted by sevdwal View Post
    Of course there are alternatives. How about choosing one that is developer and customer-friendly, for a start?
    I believe that my proposal was the costomer friendy one. But after all the implementations details are irrelevant until we have a decizion about what will be done. I belive that the notion of transferring application licenses from one platform to another has value, and such a conversion tool should be made available to developers.
    -- Lucian

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    Re: To Develop on Windows Phone, or Not? ... Is That Really the Question?

    Quote Originally Posted by ltomuta View Post
    If Symbian is dead, why are we still talking about here? I believe that the premise of this discussion is that Symbian is still a valid business proposition, with an existing market not yet exploited to its full potential, and with room to grow still, whithing the predefined constraints.
    There is still a business proposition with Symbian, even though it is dead. But competing platforms also have valid business propositions. It is then a matter of evaluating all the business propositions and trying to find a strategy that is good for you as a developer. This means that no developer is going to delist from Ovi, as the money being made there right now is free, all costs being sunk. Doing some maintenance is fine too is that keeps revenue flowing and customers happy. Embarking on a complete rewrite in Qt is not.

    Nokia owns lots of things, but not people. That was never the point. The point was that of a partnership, in which Nokia contributes assets and developers contribute assets, hoping to have success together. I do believe those users would buy apps, if there are apps which they want to buy.
    Where was that partnership when people uploaded cracked Symbian software on Nokia's community file sharing site? Besides, the same argument can be made for the competition. What is so special about Nokia that we should keep on choosing them?

    Users buying apps because they want to buy them. Sigh. How compelling.

    Oh, so now you want to be "owned" by Nokia?
    I'lll be happy to sell the company if the price is right :-) Make me an offer.
    Last edited by sevdwal; 2011-03-09 at 15:44.

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    Re: To Develop on Windows Phone, or Not? ... Is That Really the Question?

    Quote Originally Posted by wizard_hu_ View Post
    That reasoning is questionable. Mixing end-users with developers and extrapolating the behavior of one, based on an assumption about the behavior of the other is something that does not work.

    Do you really think that an end-user will take into account the availability of a fat installer format? (Yes, the concept of fat things is invented already, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fat_binary, if you have not heard about it, what would you expect from the average user?)
    Where is the user-friendly benefit? Nowadays if you want to sell your stuff, you definitely do not want the user to copy the installer between his/her devices, the neighbor's, and anyone else's on warez.org. Then, what? Is it about the 2x2 minutes of uploading the two builds of the application for publishing, instead of uploading them with a single click in a single .zip file?
    No, I do NOT think that having two files in a zip file will compel a user into buying Symbian apps, whether this a fat binary or something else.

    As I said, I think a user will be more inclined to buy software if his investment in that software will keep its value after the transfer to WP.

    I also think that having a single entry for that App in the app store, whether it is Ovi or the Microsoft one, is a good idea because it hammers home the message that it is a single app than will run on both Symbian and WP.

    I also think that a user is more inclined to buy a new Nokia WP phone is he sees that his favorite apps are available for that phone, and that he doesn't have to spend money to buy new apps if he goes to the competition.

    The downside of sideloading can always be prevented by forbidding sideloading. That is good idea anyway. Works for Apple. WP doesn't allow sideloading either.

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